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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 11:05 am 
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Location: Port Dover, Ontario
Hi,

Thought I would post some images of my latest piece of trackwork build in N scale.

This is a quad diamond, part of the Bronx Terminal that once existed in New York. I have been building this in HO scale, but thought I would take a crack at on in N scale as well.

Image

Image

More on this can be found on my CNJ Bronx Terminal website.

http://www.bronx-terminal.com/

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Tim Warris
Fast Tracks
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PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 3:35 pm 
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Tim, the craftsmanship of your trackwork has always impressed me! Very, very nice work!

Donnell M. Wells

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2008 11:16 am 
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The quad crossing looks great. I built one for the UPRR Rochelle Sub a number of year ago and was never really very happy with it. As I am rebuilding Rochelle as part of the new UPRR Geneva Sub, I am looking forward to doing a much better job on the quad crossing. One thing that was difficult was the electrical aspect of the crossing. Do you have detailed information on where gaps are cut in the PC ties and how the quad crossing is wired?

Daryl


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2008 4:42 pm 
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How do you file the rail to the precise angles needed? The PointForm makes great frogs, but obviously only one angle. I can't see how to "freehand" the angle with the degree of precision necessary for good joints.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2008 5:14 pm 
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Quote:
Do you have detailed information on where gaps are cut


I have a basic drawing I prepared showing where the gaps are to be cut in the rails.

The PC board tie gaps are cut to allow each frog to be isolated from the rest of the crossing. Each frog is controlled from a corresponding turnout's switch machine. Depending on the route selected, the switch machine will route the appropriate power to the necessary frog. Wiring crossings can get complex, four of them together should be a challenge....

You might notice that some of the gaps will require the entire tie to also be cut. I started to cut some of the gaps for the N scale crossing, as I get asked often where they will go. After cutting a few I found the trackwork to get quite flimsy, so I decided to not cut any others until it is mounted in place. Same with the HO version.


Attachments:
File comment: Gapping for CNJ Bronx Terminal Quad Crossing
crossing-with-gaps.jpg
crossing-with-gaps.jpg [ 96.35 KiB | Viewed 4986 times ]

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Tim Warris
Fast Tracks
http://www.fast-tracks.net
service@fast-tracks.net
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2008 5:25 pm 
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Location: Port Dover, Ontario
Quote:
How do you file the rail to the precise angles needed


No PointForm tools used for this crossing.

Actually, the technique I used for constructing this crossing didn't require forming any frog points....

Custom fixtures were designed to allow me to produce very precise "lap" joints. All the rails were soldered together and the flangeways cleaned out very carefully. The entire section was built using 16 pieces of rail.

The remaining trackwork on the layout did require lots of hand forming of precise frog and switch point angles. These were all produced free hand using a benchtop sander following a precise line scribed onto the top of the rail. A bit of trial and error was required...

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Tim Warris
Fast Tracks
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 11:18 am 
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Tim Warris wrote:
Quote:
Do you have detailed information on where gaps are cut

You might notice that some of the gaps will require the entire tie to also be cut. I started to cut some of the gaps for the N scale crossing, as I get asked often where they will go. After cutting a few I found the trackwork to get quite flimsy, so I decided to not cut any others until it is mounted in place. Same with the HO version.


Tim,

What do you plan to cut the rail with, since you will not be able to use a jeweler's saw once the crossing is mounted?

Daryl


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 1:12 pm 
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Hi Daryl,

All the gaps will be cut with a jewelers saw prior to installing the trackwork in place. Once in place cutting a gap in such small and complex track with any type of rotary tool would likely be impossible.

I suspect I will find out though, surly one will be missed....

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Fast Tracks
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2008 12:17 am 
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They can be hard to find, but there are really thin diamond dremel wheels that go through track like butter. They are like $12 per wheel, but last a lot longer than the normal abrasive discs. They cut a thinner notch too.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2008 9:17 am 
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Indeed the thin diamond wheels are excellent. However, they are not the panacea for all circumstances. With tight clearances and especially with N and smaller scales, it's not the thinness, but the diameter and it's associated 'collateral' damage of extending out beyond the cutting area of those close quarters.

What we really need is a supper thin reciprocal saw arrangement that can be easily controlled. An affordable laser cutter would also be rather nice tool to consider.

-ed-

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 02, 2010 12:45 am 
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emccamey wrote:
Indeed the thin diamond wheels are excellent. However, they are not the panacea for all circumstances. With tight clearances and especially with N and smaller scales, it's not the thinness, but the diameter and it's associated 'collateral' damage of extending out beyond the cutting area of those close quarters.
What we really need is a supper thin reciprocal saw arrangement that can be easily controlled. An affordable laser cutter would also be rather nice tool to consider.-ed-

Not a riciprocating saw but the Fein Multimaster would be the ideal tool for the job.
Image
They even have a tool set for "hobbies" that looks ideal.
Image

I'd thought about using my multimaster for this but I had never seen that tool set before. Looks like I'll be placing an order for it shortly. There are other brands similar to the Fein - Dremel and Rockwell being two of them - but they don't get within a bull's roar of the Fein. Of course they also don't cost as much as the Fein but you really do get what you pay for. One of the best tool investments I ever made and it looks like it's found another use for me!


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 26, 2010 2:17 am 
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Location: Melbourne, Australia
So how did you go with the Fein Multimaster ?

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